Events

CCE MathWorks Prizes for Outstanding Research

CCE, in conjunction with MathWorks, is pleased to announce the creation of the CCE MathWorks Prizes for Outstanding Research.
 
We would like to thank MathWorks for their support of the MIT Center for Computational Engineering and in particular for their generous sponsorship of the Computation for Design and Optimization and Computational Science and Engineering prizes for outstanding Master's and PhD research, respectively.
 
A formal announcement of the prizes will be made at the CCE Welcome Reception on Tuesday September 5th at 4:00 PM in 1-114. All members of the CCE community are welcome to attend.
 
More information about the prizes can be found at https://computationalengineering.mit.edu/CCEMathWorksResearchPrizes

MIT Distinguished Seminar Series in Computational Science and Engineering
Thursday, October 5, 2017 | 12:00 PM | 35-225

Between Kinetic Theory and Navier Stokes - Modeling Fluids at the Mesoscale
John Bell
Computational Research Division Chief Scientist and Senior Scientist, Deputy Director, Combustion Exascale Co-Design Center (ExaCT)
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy

At small scales, the Navier-Stokes equations traditionally used for fluid modeling break down and thermal fluctuations play an important role in the dynamics. Landau and Lifshitz proposed a modified version of the Navier-Stokes equations, referred to as the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations (FNS) that incorporates stochastic flux terms designed to incorporate the effect of fluctuations. These stochastic fluxes are constructed so that the FNS equations are consistent with equilibrium fluctuations from statistical mechanics. Here we describe the development and analysis of finite-volume methods for solving the equations of fluctuating hydrodynamics for miscible fluid mixtures. We focus on low Mach number models for multicomponent systems and discuss generalizations to include chemical reactions and charged fluids. We present numerical results that validate the methodology and illustrate the impact of fluctuations on systems out of equilibrium.

MIT Distinguished Seminar Series in Computational Science and Engineering
Thursday, November 2, 2017 | 12:00 PM | 35-225

Physics-based Animation at Pixar
Fernando de Goes
Senior Scientist
Pixar Animation Studios

Pixar's films rely heavily on physically simulated effects such as the motion of hair, cloth, and water, to cite a few. Whereas physical accuracy is of paramount importance in engineering applications, the most important aspects of feature film production are directability and speed. In this talk, I'll survey our recent work in this area, including a robust hyperelastic material model for flesh simulation, a high-performance physically based volume sculpting technique, and a method for solving differential equations on subdivision surfaces.

MIT Distinguished Seminar Series in Computational Science and Engineering
Thursday, February 8, 2018 | 12:00 PM | 35-225

Jorge Nocedal
David and Karen Sachs Professor of Industrial Engineering
Northwestern University

MIT Distinguished Seminar Series in Computational Science and Engineering
Thursday, April 26, 2018 | 12:00 PM | 35-225

Mauro Maggioni
Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics
Johns Hopkins University

MIT Distinguished Seminar Series in Computational Science and Engineering
Thursday, May 10, 2018 | 12:00 PM | 35-225

Philipp Hennig
Max Planck Research Group Leader, Probabilistic Numerics
Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems, Tübingen, Germany